Family Literacy

How do you help people who don’t want to be found?

This question was asked in a recent article about a woman, Denise O’Neal, who is sharing her literacy struggles in the hopes it will help others get the help they need. Denise did not begin her advocacy for adult literacy willingly. “For most of her life, Denise O’Neal did a good job hiding her secret from the world. Then in 2006, when she struggled to read a Dr. Seuss book to her 3-year-old son, her secret was out. ...

My Mother by Dempsey

READ students come from diverse backgrounds and each has a unique story to tell. Their stories are frequently compelling, sometimes heartbreaking, but always inspiring. Dempsey, a READ Center student, was asked by one of his teachers to write a story for The READ Center’s blog. This is his story.   My Mother by Dempsey My mother was a strong lady.  She had five children and she loved us a lot.  I remember my daddy left us when I was five years old.  My mother...

How Literacy Rates Have Improved Since 1776

Today, 1 in 6 adults — approximately 35 million Americans — possess reading skills below the level of a fourth-grader. Studies show that adult literacy rates have not improved over the past 25 years, but many believe that this is still a marked improvement from where we were before the creation of the public school system. There’s a common misconception that Americans were illiterate before the 1830s. But in reality, that’s not quite true. In fact, the answer to...

My Life Struggles with Reading by Joanna Ford

  I am a middle-aged woman who struggled with reading and writing for a long time.  Although I am a high school graduate, I still have trouble reading.  I did not understand how important those two things were until later in life.  When I heard about the Read Center I decided to attend. It has been ten years and I am still attending the Read Center.  It has help me appreciate the value of reading.  Without the Read Center I don’t thing...

It’s the family that makes the difference

This week is National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week. The goal of the week is to raise public awareness about the need for and value of adult education and family literacy. So it is fitting to kick off the week with an article on the importance family plays in education. If you missed Mareen Downey’s article in the Richmond Times Dispatch last week, It’s the family that makes the difference, it’s worth reading. The article reviews the findings of a...

Why has adult ed come to mean only high school completion and college entry, when there is such a critical need for beginning-reading programs?

It’s a great question and one we ask often at The READ Center. A recent Proliteracy blog provides some answers and raises even more questions. “There are 36 million Americans reading below a third-grade level. The non-reading adult is all but unemployable, severely hampered in his or her ability to navigate the digital world—never mind something as basic as public transportation or a utility bill. Recent calculations have suggested that for every dollar invested in literacy programs, $5 is saved in...

Mayor Stoney Issues Proclamation

City of Richmond Proclamation: National Adult Education & Family Literacy Week

September 24 – September 30, 2017 is National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week. Read Mayor Levar Stoney’s Proclamation below. Transcript: WHEREAS, The Reading and Education for Adult Development (READ) Center is a community-based nonprofit organization providing educational opportunities to adults with low-level reading and communication skills; and WHEREAS, READ was founded as the Literacy Council of Metropolitan Richmond in 1982 by Altrusa International Richmond, Inc., a professional women’s business service club and became a 501(c)(3) organization in 1984; and WHEREAS, in the City of Richmond,...

Adult Education and Family Literacy Week Teach the Parent

The Weight of the World is Off My Shoulders

September 24 – September 30 is Adult Education and Family Literacy Week. Watch as a mom shares her secret to her family after years of not being able to read. According to ProLiteracy, a mother’s education level is the greatest determinant of her children’s future academic success, outweighing other factors such as neighborhood and family income. By supporting The READ Center, you help stop the cycle of low-literacy among families in Richmond. Donate now.  ...